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StackOverflow Meta - Why do you lose reputation for down-voting? Main points of top answer copied here: The motivation behind it is to put emphasis on up-voting or not voting at all. This way, down votes will carry more weight and it will also prevent users from abusing the system by down-voting excessively. According to what Jeff/Joel discussed on ...


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High-quality, useful content. That doesn't seem terribly helpful, but it's the only strategy that consistently works. Basically, there are three ways you can earn rep. Note that a lot of this is covered in the help center page What is Reputation? How do I earn (and lose) it?; actually a lot of everything is in the Help Center. Read the Help Center, it's ...


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Here is a quick query in data explorer. select sum(reputation) as total_rep from users For our site, it returns 11803197 (as of Dec 2017)


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Your latest comment seems to answer this. Your physical proximity to another user (and their consistent attention to your questions and answers) seems to have triggered some sort of anti-sockpuppeting mechanism. Per Shog9's post on the subject of sockpuppets What you think is a sockpuppet could in fact be my good friend Nog Shine, who loves ...


13

Your reputation has already been recalculated. As a moderator I can see a log in your user history which notes a reputation recalculation at November 13 19:34:47Z from 2,074 to 2,738. You can also confirm for yourself that you have received 10 reputation per question upvote by looking at your reputation history, either in your profile or by browsing to ...


12

You hit the repcap today. Congratulations. To fully explain what was going on with your reputation, I first need to explain how the repcap works. Note that a lot of this is covered in the Help Center, but I'm going to go through it in rather more detail than they do there. The first thing to understand is that reputation changes broadly fall into two ...


12

Getting -2 from a 'User was removed' means that you got +2 from that user before the deletion of their account. The easiest way I can think of for this to happen would be: you accepted one of their answers However, other sequences of events that might cause a net +2 rep gain include: they upvoted one of your questions and you downvoted three of their ...


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Users are moderated mostly by each other and ultimately by moderators. The fact that one user did a lot of protecting of questions is not, by itself, a problem. Many questions need protecting due to attracting too many low-quality answers. As one of the site's most active reviewers currently, TheLethalCarrot probably sees a lot of these low-quality answers, ...


10

Thinking back to my earliest days on the site, I have to say that the quickest way to earn the minimum rep required to begin actively participating is the "unanswered question" list. With even a modicum of research you can usually find and answer a couple of the more niche questions and earn a few upvotes. The best overall advice I can give is to find a ...


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This user is presently suspended. When their suspension ends, their reputation score will automatically be reinstated and recalculated if their answers and questions have been up or down - voted.


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The reputation from upvotes is capped at 200. However, some things aren't capped, namely: Bounties. Points from accepted answers (+15 if someone selects your answer) I see in your case someone selected your answer, thus you got a bonus 15 points. So you could actually get 10 more points still.


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This should be very easy to do with a simple SEDE query that just sums the reputation of all users. Using such a query (and considering the usual weekly update frequency of the data explorer) this reputation sum would be 6,317,380 at the time of answering.


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When they fix the problems with it on MSE as explained by Jon. It will run sometimes after that. Yes it is, but for now it's just on MSE. We're working through some problems as we speak. — Jon Ericson ♦ The rep recalc appears to have finished for SFF now. There were lots of items to process so it was taking its time. As current events are coming in now ...


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You're looking at the reputation of the users in this calendar month, August. Since this user gave a bounty, their reputation in the last month has fallen. Due to the numbers, it's evident that they probably gave a 200 reputation bounty (on this) and got one downvote.


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See: Something wrong with monthly user rep - some users show quarterly figures? tl;dr: we forgot to reset the counter on monthly rep this month. It should be correct again come September.


5

As @Richard explained in a comment, instead of thinking of receiving bounties as being exempt from the rep cap limit, it better to think of it like this: Offering and claiming bounties both affect the rep cap limit in the amount equal to their value. Offering a +50 bounty reduces your cap to 150 and simultaneously reduces your rep by 50. Earning a +50 ...


5

One of your answers was deleted You wrote a question here1, asking whether Turbo Boost could be used to jump a car. You also answered that question. As you can see, your answer has 3 upvotes and 3 downvotes, for a net reputation gain of 3*10-3*2 = 24 reputation. When the question was deleted, you lost that reputation. Why was the question deleted? The ...


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Write answers This is the most efficient way. For each upvote you get on an answer, you receive 10 points. A decent answer can easily get five upvotes, putting you at 50 reputation. A good answer is detailed; longer answers tend to be well received, but only if the information is relevant. Quotes and other sources help make a good answer. Ask questions ...


5

The patterns of voting that you've experienced aren't unusual, nor do they represent "serial downvoting", even if it's the same person that has downvoted you. Pretty much any time serial downvoting occurs is when a user disagrees with something another user has posted, either as an answer or comment. The user then visits their profile and, like ...


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Post numbers; Vote Counts; Site Traffic; Site analytic and Traffic Sources; All of which is basically pointless. Apparently SE would prefer that we not share the raw data (huh?) but is happy to share the analysis that results from it (huh?).


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To add to Pearson's excellent theoretical answer, you can see specifically where you got the rep in 2 ways: Your reputation tab on user page: https://scifi.stackexchange.com/users/19374/shevliaskovic?tab=reputation Note the green square around the last line's rep (15) - that "+15 accept" is what caused you to get 205. Green background indicates that ...


4

You have earned 200+ (247) reputation points in one day. I forgot how the math for things like this work, but when you have earned 200 reputation points in one day, you are capped at how many new reputation points you can earn for upvotes on old activity. But I believe you do get reputation points for 100% new activity such as posting a new question that is ...


4

There are different reputation requirements for private betas, public betas, graduated sites, Stack Overflow, and Meta SO. Reputation requirements compared Betas need different requirements because there just aren't many people with the rep to do anything at graduated levels, especially towards the beginning.


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It looks like events under days that are expanded when the page loads lack the detail arrows for individual posts; those that load closed do contain the arrows when expanded. The bottom row here (+40) should say 4 events and expand; Like this This seems somewhat intermittent. For instance, my SO profile exhibits the bug, but Jon Skeet's does not. On ...


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This was a fun problem, made more fun by the nature of it. It was a problem with the time epoch calculation used in the AJAX request that fetches the post data underneath. The interesting bit is that UTC users (included Oded!) weren't affected by it because their time offset matched. A fix for all other users will roll out in the next build, it's just a ...


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We don't know. The exact thresholds for things like what counts as serial voting, or automatic question and answer bans, are kept secret. If they were public, people might be able to abuse them. I've even heard of people abusing the system using things to do with account deletion, so that might be a reason to keep the threshold for vote invalidation after ...


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I'm pretty sure that you do, so long as it's relatively quick, but I'm not really sure, so... If it does work, it shouldn't take very long. The reputation is supposed to be updated in near real time.


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No. From the help page for meta: Voting is different on meta. Like normal Stack Exchange sites, Meta allows members to vote on questions and answers. For most posts, votes reflect the perceived usefulness: well-written, well-reasoned, well-researched posts tend to get more attention and more upvotes. Highly-voted and frequently-linked posts may become part ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible