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18

What I do largely depends on the media in question. Books I have all of my main books in (full-text searchable) e-book format: The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Hobbit, etc. All seven Harry Potter books, plus the Cursed Child and Fantastic Beasts published scripts and the three Pottermore e-books Most of the canon Star Wars books and novelizations, and ...


17

A quote is meant to be exactly what was said. By changing it to what should have been said, you're putting words into their mouth. (That is, it looks like you did the right thing) If the error was in the original, keep the error. If it becomes an issue, put "[sic]" in the quote immediately after the error - this is the usual way to indicate the error is ...


15

Is this worth arguing about? Just edit the damn thing. Heck, you could've pulled the citation off of the same quote in another answer if you'd cared to. Anyone could've: the author of that answer, the person who commented on it, some passing reader... I don't even own a copy of LotR, I didn't even bother reading the other answers, and still it took me ...


15

Work in progress/we have a long way to go I’m working on a little script which can get a decent estimate. When/if it’s done, I’ll post the results here, and I’ll put the code/an explanation on my website. Right now I have: the complete HTML for every question and answer posted in the Harry Potter tag a stripped out version that only includes quoted text (...


12

What Shog9 says is excellent advice when you don't know, or there is no policy: Don't let "the rules" stop you from doing what's right, doing what's useful. The rules exist to serve the community, not to tie its hands and force it to the ground. Shog9 All the examples you give are for a misleading lack of attribution, but stating that your quote is ...


11

General Case In the general case I would say it is usually preferable to translate the quotes, even if it is just using an online service. However, when doing so (and this is a practice I've seen done around the site) you should leave the quote from the original language and include the translated one too. That way it helps everyone and people can spot ...


9

Star Trek TV / Movies For Star Trek, you can't really do much better than the Script Search facility on Chakoteya.net. You can search by word, phrase and even who said the words. Doctor Who / Star Trek (original scripts) Since Chakoteya hosts the Doctor Who transcripts (along with Andromeda and Stargate) but has no dedicated search facility, I tend to ...


8

There are two questions here; Copyright and readability. I'll address them in that order. Copyright Since these are fan-transcriptions, copyright is an issue, but not much of one. This is a site dedicated to discussion of sci-fi and as such, posting even very large chunks of text (short of entire book chapters and large sections of original scripts) is ...


7

You can get the quarterly data dump and process that. However, you get XML files, so ugh. Instead, you can do this via the API (e.g. start with the questions tagged [harry-potter]) to get JSON and as a bonus get live information. To get you started: import json import gzip import urllib2 import StringIO def read_url(url): req = urllib2.Request("http:...


7

If you have an exact quote ... ... Google it! Whether it's from a book, a film, or a TV show, this usually works, at least for more popular works (it's less reliable for obscurer ones). By doing a web search for the exact quote, or the part of it you remember, you might find: (for written works) either a Google Books version of the work in question, or a ...


7

For this I used some arguably pretty narrow definitions for what counts as a quote. I assumed that a quote is, at very least, a link back to the original post. This link has to have the following format: scifi.stackexchange.com/a/<postid>. The query then takes all posts that contain such links, checks whether they link back to one of your posts, at ...


6

Google* Before doing anything else, try searching for any phrases or keywords you might remember. If the work is well-known, and the phrase is catchy, odd’s are someone has written it online at one point or another. Besides, there’s a decent chance this will turn up the phrase even if you get some of it wrong. Don’t forget to append the name of the work, ...


4

You should translate. Both for the sake of future non-bilingual readers, AND as another comment noted, for search purposes. You should also make it clear the methodology for translation - is it copy from officially translated work? Your personal translation as a biligual person? Google Translate without fixing? This way the reader can gauge the quality of ...


3

There's no hard and fast guideline. What I've found works for me is what you've described as #6; placing script quotes into inline boxes (with the > key). I also bold the name of the person speaking, use italics to indicate speech and place square quotes to indicate non-speech directions: WORF: Captain, I recommend we fire photon torpedoes PICARD: Denied....


3

I do not think there is a universal “best” way to format quotes. But honestly I believe formatting of these things can get out of hand and the simplicity of the markdown formatting should be respected. In general—when it comes to markdown formatting—if you are feeling restricted by it’s limitations, many times the best solution is to rethink your overall ...


2

It depends. There's not really a clear rule and some of that comes down to personal preference. However, there are some preferred general guidelines for the overall use of SE when it comes to quote blocks in general. When quoting a larger standalone block of text you should really use a quote block, as that is what quote blocks are made for and it ...


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