Hot answers tagged

27

Every group of people who interact on a regular basis develop their own social norms, unique to the blend of individuals who comprise the whole. Different customs, humor, jargon, they all become key to a group identity. The glue that holds us together. Chat flags are a representation, a stand in, for something else entirely; The opportunity for anyone who ...


22

It's actually a good idea, in my opinion, especially for story identification questions. Think about it this way: instead of it being 'oh look how easy it was to find the info', think of it as teaching the OP - and anyone else who reads it - how to find answers. If someone asks a story-identification question, and someone answers without including the search ...


18

It's not so much that the policy has changed, it's that certain users have been aggressively flagging comments lately. Some of the comments that were flagged on the linked question included: It sounds fantastic! I remember reading a short story online about this but I can't remember what it was called or where it was. I wanna read this, ...


15

I don't think there's any policy around this; I've seen both. That being said, on a purely personal level, I favour "Too Broad" The problem with multiple-questions-in-one is just what it says on the tin: there are too many questions, which makes it more difficult for a single "best" answer to emerge. That seems like the very definition of being "too broad",...


14

Arguing against spoilerficiation on the basis of age is contrary to our established policy Such as it is, anyway; this is admittedly something we're not always very good about enforcing, but the meta discussion you linked to in this question does pretty clearly say: Don't consider the age of the material. There are still people new to Star Wars, the Matrix, ...


13

This question is way too broad. If you have a particular policy for which you'd like to reopen discussion, then feel free to start a more specific meta discussion. Depending on how the community feels about that policy, such a discussion may end up changing community consensus, leaving things as they are, or possibly getting closed as a duplicate. If you ...


11

Everyone knows the MPAA ratings are horribly inconsistent and flawed. To say that any image or sequence of images within a PG-13 rating would be appropriate to be displayed indefinitely in the main chat room is perhaps naive. Did they rate the movie PG-13 specifically for that scene, or for the movie as a whole (it can go either way). If the movie was ...


11

Since I was the user that made the edit let me address your points in this post in order. Firstly, the reason I made the edit in the first place is because providing the link on its own isn't great as the link may die at any time, in fact it's actually dead for me at the moment. This means that no one would now be able to read the review to work out if the ...


11

I'm going to leave the fact that this seems like a rant aside and assume you're asking with the best intentions of the community in mind. No we shouldn't close questions after one answer is given. It explicitly states on the stats page for Area 51 sites On a healthy site, questions receive multiple answers and the best answer is voted to the top. SFF stats ...


10

Is there a policy? No formal policy that I am aware of. Informally it is the decision of the OP if they want to accept answers or not. Should there be one? More than the informal rule of thumb, no not really. It's the OP's choice and their choice alone whether or not they wish to accept an answer. Who knows, maybe none of the answers have satisfied them ...


10

Your post is useful for the site. SFF Stack Exchange has a very clear community policy that questions should not be deleted simply because they're duplicates. Jason Baker's answer to the linked meta discussion provides lengthy arguments for why this would be a bad idea, but the TL;DR is that leaving duplicate questions undeleted increases searchability and ...


8

I wouldn't consider it rude As you suggest, it is possible that the answerer's intention was to point out how easy it was to find the answer. We expect users to do some research before asking a question, and this would be a relatively non-confrontational way of suggesting that the user should do more research in the future. It is also possible that the ...


8

Firstly, you can still see all edits to your post in the revisions history. The edit you're talking about isn't now credited to "Community"; that was a more recent edit. The editor you're talking about was TheLethalCarrot, a high-rep user but not someone who's ever been a moderator on this site. There's a few different issues involved here, so let ...


7

In the case of a mass id question I think it is almost always favourable to have a community wiki answer that everyone can contribute to. After all one big comprehensive answer is always better than dozens of partial ones. That isn't to say we haven't had cases of a single user doing almost all or all of the work but a big community effort is generally what ...


7

No, it most certainly is not adhering to the SE license. Nowhere on that page is there a mention of Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange, any mention of the CC-BY-SA license, a link to the original question, or a link to the profile of the asker, all of which are (at least as far as SE claims) requirements for mirroring their content. You should ...


6

Don't read my answer until you read Ana's. She answered perfectly and this is minor commentary. After some investigation, I found the chat item. It's an animated GIF (also available in this answer) that is mildly disturbing the first time through and exponentially annoying the next N times you can stand to watch it. Flagging is definitely called for and not ...


6

Yes, I think we as a community should have the ability to re-visit old meta policies and take new votes. Without the feel of instantaneous dupe hammering, to the exact question we are re-visiting.


6

Before the edit your answer was basically a single sentence that referred to a link without providing more than the merest hint of the content. The only thing you said that provided any link to the question was "squid." Did you try to follow the link in your answer? This is precisely the reason to include quotes from the referenced blog post. ...


5

We can ask/encourage them to accept answers, but no more than that. From this main meta question, answered by an SE employee and this one, answered by a former SE employee and its duplicate targets, it's clear that acceptance is purely voluntary and the most we can do is ask someone to accept. If someone refuses to accept any answers, that's not misuse of ...


5

Yes. Questions about the differences between a book and its film adaptation are usually quite distinctive and not like any other type of question on this site, needing a special approach in order to find answers to them. So from the beginning I'm tending towards thinking they should have their own tag. Disclaimer: I also have a personal liking for this ...


5

Specific The fact that Game of Thrones has always included extensive flashbacks and now contains Means that literally any character can be in any episode. By definition, mentioning that a character appears in a particular episode is not a spoiler since you won't know until you watch whether that character is seen live or in a flashback. General Unless a ...


4

Rand's answer is an excellent explanation of SE policy and why your specific question should remain undeleted (it increases searchability, and you can edit it to possibly re-open it). Additionally, it's worth noting that Law.SE has a question about getting one's own questions/answers deleted which notes that Users grant StackExchange a licence: You agree ...


4

YES! But evaluated on a case by case basis... Having been involved in asking and answering a few of these questions I find that there end up being lots of one line/item answers that can quickly add up. Judging from the review queues these answers are not well received and are down-voted and often times deleted. To be fair to the poster of the answer, a ...


3

The user was probably educated in American modern school. As I found out to my horror, they grade you not on how well you solve the problem in Math, but on how anal you are about documenting your solution process. So, people are trained to show their steps, on pain of downvote lower grade. Leaving that rant aside, showing how the answer was arrived at is ...


2

I agree with everything Jason Baker said in his answer, but I'd like to point out that you don't need to pontificate about how spoilerific your question is in addition to the spoiler tags. Just ask the question and use spoiler tags (and a vague title) if necessary. I'm half-tempted to remove said pontification from the main-site question we're discussing, ...


2

I'm not sure if this would be overkill or not, and I'm really only active on a few tags here, so if this suggestion doesn't fit, feel free to downvote to oblivion. I feel like these questions would be well handled by making a tag for these types of questions, and requiring, as a policy, that they be made into a community wiki. I basically stole this idea ...


1

This question was not initially close when it was asked because it was asked before the Real-world science explanations(RWSE) policy was established and for the first 4 years and 3 months it was an on-topic question. Between this post and some more recent posts there were thousands of Star Wars questions burying this post and keeping it out of sight, this ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible