31

No and yes. Or yes and no. Come in and enjoy and post questions and answers and feel free to join us in Mos Eisley where you can chat with a lot of us. Don't worry about how many points you have or badges. Seriously, just enjoy the site and contributing. But, yes, there are hard core users and friendly competition in terms of reputation points and ...


25

Congratulations! Your contribution on the site has been brilliant so far.


24

There's a little bit of competition, and a little bit of competition is good... Hi Emma and welcome to SFF:SE! I'm Praxis. I am a room owner for our chatroom. I was there when you posted this, and your post came up briefly there as Tango and CandiedMango wrote responses to you. I decided to wait a little longer to weigh in on this, mainly to formulate ...


18

It's not so much that the policy has changed, it's that certain users have been aggressively flagging comments lately. Some of the comments that were flagged on the linked question included: It sounds fantastic! I remember reading a short story online about this but I can't remember what it was called or where it was. I wanna read this, ...


17

Can the mods edit the tour? Yes, moderators can edit some of the content of the tour. However, the overall structure cannot be modified so we can't add a more extensive section to it for answering. Or should we find/make an FAQ for such occasions? I usually link to the help center instead (you can use the [help] magic link for it) since it has a ...


17

No At least it is not a competition in the way you think it is. Users here strive to answer a question as well as they can, it is not however an unfriendly competition. If you go through the site or observe chat you will see most of the regulars congratulate each other on good answers or finding a nice quote. There are few (more than who i mention) who ...


17

SE can be a competition, but only if you choose to make it one Assuming you've read the site's FAQ, you'll note that once you get beyond 25,000 reputation points, everything stops. There's literally (from a user/moderator perspective) no point in continuing. There are no more privileges to be earned, no more additional tools that can be accessed and no more,...


15

Is SFF.SE a competition? Mostly, no. It's a collaborative content creation platform with elements of gamification. What that means is that the main stated goal of participation on the site is NOT to win some competition, but to create ahem somewhat questionably sorta valuable content. The site allows competing (because it is designed with gamification ...


15

I think this won't come as a surprise to @Richard, because we've had words on this topic before, but I am extremely put off by the "rear-view mirror" comment. It bothered me in October and I didn't say anything at that time. I should have. However, since we are revisiting the topic, I will express my concern. I don't know what constitutes a "power user", ...


14

Disclaimer: this answer may contain some personal biases, as I'm an active reviewer myself. But I'll try to make clear where I'm speaking as a moderator and where I'm just voicing my own opinions as a user. NAN is sometimes flat-out wrong, but sometimes it's a matter of taste. You mention the idea of removing the "No Action Needed" button altogether, but ...


13

The only prevention advice I can give you is to read over your question before submitting, and make sure that both the title and body are: Asking the question you intended to ask Asking the same question Quite clear about the question you're asking For the third bullet, something I've seen other users do (and which I've done as well) is to write a one-...


13

The whole point of the voting system is to identify good and bad contributions. Good contributions should be upvoted and bad ones should be downvoted, regardless of whether they're from new users or more experienced users. It's fine to go looking for good contributions from new users to upvote, but giving them a "free pass" on off-topic or otherwise bad ...


12

The tour is a good resource. It's got general information about SE and how the system works; it's a good place to point a new user to, usually. But I wouldn't point them to the [tour] for specific answer guidance. Instead, point them to the How to Answer page for specific answer guidelines. This page has its own magic link - type [answer] and it'll ...


12

Well done, and we look forward to all your contributions in the new year and all the years to come as well!


11

In short there isn't much we can do on the Stack Exchange platform as it is a question and answer site, not like your regular discussion forums. As such interactions, with new users, are limited to comments and answers. There's very little you can do in comments to encourage them to stay and not much at all in answers. Here are a few possible things we can ...


9

While Jason Baker already gives quite an exhaustive rundown of the motivations for a multi-user review process, I'd like to approach your notion of a "ridiculous double standard" a little more from a mere conceptual viewpoint. There is very well a difference between making that edit yourself and just giving someone else doing it your Ok. An actual edit ...


9

I think we should heavily discourage them. They don't serve any real purpose They can be very easily misread as a chastisement They're a bit creepy : "Who is this person and why are they messaging me?" They're basically a form of spam for wannabe moderators. They encourage other low-value comments. They give a false impression that the commenter is a ...


9

Edit away rants, especially disrespectful ones. You may say it’s disrespectful to remove large portions of a post but what’s more disrespectful is the amount of bad mouthing and negative content towards in the question. Remember the Code of Conduct, Be Nice policy, whatever, applies to all, not just SE users. So much of that content was just ranting that was ...


8

It's possible to downvote without being unwelcoming. The motive behind your question is a good one, but your suggested solution is wrong. We should be welcoming to new users, yes, but not at the expense of sacrificing quality. Bad answers should always be downvoted, and non-answers should always be deleted, regardless of who posted them. The Stack Exchange ...


8

I don't think there should be a "welcome to SE" comment. Recently a user has been adding welcome comments to many new users. Here is an example: Hi and welcome to stack exchange :) I recommend you take the tour and visit the help center. Have fun with us! The intent is obviously benign, but when I first saw this, I assumed that the OP had done ...


7

This sort of feature would almost certainly have to be network-wide, so Super Meta may be a better place for this request. But here's my take anyway. Don't allow new users to edit Strongly opposed. There's a huge swathe of edits that you don't need a lot of experience with a site to handle; the spelling and grammar example you give is one. There's lots of ...


7

Not sure why, but I was looking at meta today (haven't done much of anything on this site in a long while) and spotted this question. The competitive nature from a few very active specific users was what turned me off from remaining an active user of this site. I would like to say that I started really being active here while competition took second place ...


7

When looking at the page of questions, there are only three types of descriptions: Asked Answered Modified The first two are pretty straightforward. They refer, respectively, to newly asked questions, or newly answered questions. "Modified" covers any other type of activity on a post. Most of the time "modified" will be an edit, as that is simply the most ...


6

In the specific cases you mention - the First Posts and Late Answers review queues - there are strict definitions of "new user". The First Posts review queue contains posts from users who've never posted on the site before: it literally means first posts. This queue was implemented in 2012; see New Review Queue: First Posts on main meta. The Late Answers ...


5

I would point them to both. Hello, and welcome to the site! In order to help us better answer your question, I would recommend you read the help section on how to ask better questions. The tour page will also give you a better idea of what Stack Exchange is about, and our question/answer format (As opposed to discussion style). Obviously, edit slightly ...


4

How about we allow them, but remove them after a while? I think welcoming new users is a good thing. I try to make the comment relevant beyond just "welcome to SFF.SE, see the [tour] and the [help]". But if the message is just that, it's still valuable to a new user, to be welcomed in the community, especially if the user is new to the Stack Exchange ...


4

This site is whatever you want it to be. Everyone has their own reasons for being here, and their own approach to contributing. If you don't feel the need to compete, you don't have to. If you see a benefit to competing, have at it. The one thing this site will always be is a recreational activity, which is solely intended for entertainment and ...


3

In a case like this where your question is closely related to another question on the site, I would suggest mentioning the related question(s) in your post and explaining why your question is different. This will help everyone understand exactly what you are asking and make it less likely that users will vote to close it as a duplicate. This is mainly a ...


3

I'm of a split opinion on this. If a new user does something wrong, I say go for it. It's a polite way of saying "hey, you're new here, you might not have been aware of this BUT..." rather than coming down hard on them and making them feel like they aren't welcome or they need to read and memorize EVERY single rule, regulation and policy. On the other ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible