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21

Information from new works should be used to answer old questions Normally this is where I would discuss why I think that's true, but I'm at a loss for what to write; it seems so completely obvious to me, and is what we've been doing on this site since basically forever. Even in the Harry Potter canon, a bunch of old questions get new (or updated) answers ...


15

They belong on both... Questions about what is/isn't canon have a place on both the main site and on meta, but for subtly different reasons: They belong on the main site when asking about what "really happened" in a creative work. As you say, this is the kind of thing that's of great interest to fans of a creative universe. It's true that "...


11

One of the main issues that Potter fans face is precisely what and how you define Harry Potter "canon". In short, there have been precious few announcements by Rowling herself (or the various publishers and studios involved in publishing and adapting her works) regarding the canon status of her works, so fans (like Ibid) have taken it upon themselves to ...


10

My major issue with this idea is that you're expecting the moderation team to make personal value judgments about which answers in a given tag are obsolete and which aren't. Given that our current moderation team (of five) boast just two gold tag badges between them, expecting them to somehow have a total grasp of what constitutes the current highest ...


10

This is an interesting question. Unless stated otherwise, I would utilize multiple canon sources to answer a question, but judiciously. For example, if I were answering a Harry Potter question, I would definitely use all the books, any direct information from the author, and information from (more) reliable websites, such as the HP Lexicon or Pottermore. I ...


9

The term Canon in works of fiction refers to any 'authoritative' body of work related to said work of fiction. In fiction, canon is the material accepted as part of the story in an individual universe of that story.-Canon (fiction), Wikipedia 'Authoritative' can refer to any work which is approved or written specifically by the original author(s). This ...


9

It depends on the work in question and on whom you ask. They're at best lesser canon, but an answer based on a deleted scene would usually be acceptable. At one end of the spectrum, we have Star Wars, which currently takes a very strict approach to canonicity, with the vast majority of its existing material falling under 'Legends' rather than canon. The ...


8

Yes. Questions about Legends material from the Star Wars universe are on-topic. (Hell, even questions about fan fiction are on-topic here, and material that used to be considered some level or other of canon is a lot higher up the pecking order than that!) And how would I format such questions to be clear what I am asking? You can make clear in the text ...


8

Questions about games that do not involve Mario or Luigi (or their evil doppelgangers) should not be tagged super-mario-brothers. The characters of Mario and Donkey Kong originated in the same game, and there are plenty of instances where they appear together. However, their is essentially no continuity to the Mario Brothers or Donkey Kong games, so it ...


7

There was no reason to add the comment in the question re: the bounty because the bounty already contains the conditions for which it will be awarded. IMO you are conflating the bounty with all answers which is incorrect. Thus, the initial edit to remove it was appropriate, and possibly even the next two. I think the original edit you made re: the bounty ...


6

Here is the wonderful thing about Stack Exchange sites. You can receive multiple answers! In cases like this where there is ambiguity and uncertainty about which sources are being asked about, there can exist multiple answers. For example, say we have a Green Lantern question which, as far as the question goes, could be about the comic books, the movie, ...


6

Both. A great answer would include an explanation of the original book/film/show (etc) source, and also explain that the author had later contradicted this. We're trying to educate and entertain people and help them understand things, not establish some sort of gospel for a one true answer. In addition, it's up to the OP to decide whether or not the ...


6

I'm reasonably sure that the problem here is your (extensive) mention of General Order 19, a fan-fiction creation from the ST-Minutiae website. It seems like you're asking people to agree or disagree with a rule that was conceived outside of the Star Trek canon, which typically includes the films and TV shows. I can see things from your perspective. You ...


6

I've found that there are two main things which seem to be frowned upon citing in answers: Citing a source which isn't generally accepted here as canon. Citing a secondary source Accepted canon There is no official policy regarding Harry Potter canon that has been produced by either JK Rowling or any other offical source. In general this site seems to ...


6

I'm pretty sure you just answered yourself in your question. As Valorum states in another answer to the question you linked, there have been precious few announcements by Rowling herself (or the various publishers and studios involved in publishing and adapting her works) regarding the canon status of her works, so fans (like Ibid) have taken it upon ...


5

Both, in essence. If a question about canon is about a specific universe it needs to be asked on the main site and have the appropriate tags added. Example: How is canonicity of derivative works determined for Star Wars? Example: Which Harry Potter works are considered canon? If the question is how we treat canon or the mechanics of using canon in ...


5

So is there reason to specify what's “real” in a fictional universe? I assume that you're asking this in the context of SFF.SE and not life in general. As such, the answer is a definite "Yes", there is a reason. Because: That's basically what many, if not most, users come to this site for in the first place. The spirit of the site is about studying works ...


3

The Harry Potter movies are complete garbage. Anyone caught citing them in an answer would be burned at the stake. This is a simplification. I would divide the Harry Potter franchise into these domains: The "book canon," consisting of the books and (perhaps) Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The "film canon," consisting of the films. The "video game ...


3

Mark all such questions with a new star-wars-legends tag. No need to edit anything in the answers Optionally, some of the questions where EU works don't have an answer as of 2014, add an answer which states that most likely, this can never be answered since Lucasfilm indicated no new Legends (formerly EU C-canon) works will be published. Benefits: Allows ...


3

Star Wars trailers are not canon (in themselves). Trailers are usually treated in the same way as any other mixed-canon source (such as a novelisation or pre-2014 factbook). The material in the trailer that appears in the show is canon. The material that appears in the trailer that doesn't appear in the show is non-canon and is treated as a "deleted scene". ...


3

I agree with Slytherincess's answer. The level and quantity of canon varies drastically from world to world - Star Wars has an explicit canon structure, and hundreds of sources, Tolkien has copious published notes to go along with the books and the movies, while some world consist of only a handful of books. Sometimes you can look at the question to ...


1

Muggles' Guide to Harry Potter on en.Wikibooks is generally reliable. This is a secondary source, that is, it shouldn't create new canon, but only summarizes reference information from the existing canon in thematic form, especially information from the seven main books. It is useful because in my experience, it doesn't have the amount of made up ...


1

Trailer material is canon, with caveats. It’s part of the published material from the same people who make the film and/or TV show, so I think it qualifies as canon. However, I’d class it as a lower level of canon: in particular, if the film or episode is released and contradicts the trailer, then the full version takes precedence. You have to be a little ...


1

My proposal would be as follows (the approach is heavily based on Wookieepedia canon policy): Any answer which has content from both New Canon (G+T canon and new Disney material), as well as Legends (formerly known as C-canon or Extended Universe material), should have TWO separate sections: New Canon put in the parts of the answer that are based on New ...


1

Add a special note (akin to moderator notes on Skeptics.SE) explaining that the question deals with Star Wars Legends brand material. The rest of the answer same as this, except that the note makes the star-wars-legends tag either optional or not needed at all.


1

I don't think this is feasible on as grand a scale as you propose ... Adding a notice to every answer of the form "this is unknown as of now, but may be revealed in later canon" in order to put a timestamp on when that later canon is likely to be published would be a pretty big operation, and probably not feasible. ... but maybe in one particular setting. ...


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