-3

After watching the tag, I noticed that many questions are of poor quality, simply because the information provided is very minimal.

This issue was already discussed here but the thread is already 3 or 4 years old.

The problem with low quality questions on this tag is, that it's just a guessing game. With too little information, the possible answers are too many to give a precise answer.

I'm somewhat active on anime/manga stackexchange and they have a special reason to mark a question as off topic because there is too little information. Questioned with enough votes are put on hold.

On the mentioned site is a checklist, of which at least three points should be covered by a question to be considered on topic.

Link to original post

The list covered following items:

  • Any description of the leading/recurring character(s) (i.e. physical description, behavior, etc.)
  • Any description of any distinctive features, including the plot and related elements (e.g. girls who are soda cans that do battle, or i.e., the setting, the plot)
  • What the genre or cinematic style was (e.g. mecha, sci-fi, fantasy, shonen, shoujo, seinen, noir, cyberpunk, etc.)
  • What the drawing/animation style is like
  • When and where you saw it (if you saw it when you were a kid, don't give your age, give the approximate year, and month if possible)
  • Who the publisher, licensor, and/or distributor was
  • Type of media: TV show, OVA, movie, manga, web-series, one-shot, etc.
  • Any image(s), audio, or video(s) related to the series (an exception may be made for questions with one or more of these items)

This answer also links to a second thread which lists following points:

Primary

  • A complete description of one significant character: Hair color, eye color, skin tone, clothes, etc.
  • A complete description of one significant location: Type of location (farm, house, etc.), style of location (colors, notable characteristics), etc.
  • A complete description of a plot point: Detailed information about a story arc, central theme of an episode, or concept focused on

Secondary

  • Character's name (approximations are fine)
  • Incomplete character descriptions: Gender, approximate hair style, etc.
  • Type of media: OVA, TV show, serialized manga, one-shot, doujin, etc.
  • Publisher, licensor, distributor, etc.

Tertiary

  • Year you saw it (and month, if possible)
  • Publication you read it in, or TV channel/network you saw it on
  • What language your read/saw it in
  • What kind of art style it has
  • Genre

Of course, answering three points doesn't automatically mean that the answer is of a higher quality. But the chances that we have enough information to narrow it down to a single instance are higher.

An example for such a question would be:

Last year, I read a Manga about a boy, coming into a school where they learn magic. At first nobody liked him, but later on, he became popular.

The problem with this question is, that the description isn't detailed enough. I can think of at least half a dozen mangas which cover all of this.

Almost all of the points in the lists can be adapted to SciFi work, that is not necessarily anime/manga.

Examples of bad quality questions:

  • 3
    Your last example is not a great question but if "(1) a book out before 2004 with (2) a moon base, (3) a spaceship fight, (4) a wormhole, (5) a crash landing, (6) a Cain-and-Abel story, and (7) an alternate Earth with (8) egg-shaped cars (9) that fix themselves" is not enough to "narrow it down to a single instance", please give me 2 or 3 examples.. – user14111 Apr 15 '16 at 23:16
8

I disagree (with gusto)

SFF:SE has always been especially tolerant of questions. It is one of our key specialties and something that we should (rightly) take great pride in. Artificially trying to limit this number (as Movies:SE have unsuccessfully attempted to do for several years) by setting an arbitrary quality boundary will simply result in;

  • Fewer visitors
  • A larger number of highly contentious arguments
  • A smaller volume of questions overall (and)
  • A less active and interesting site.

While we should certainly encourage users to improve the quality of their questions (the recent "How to ask a good ident question" FAQ being a good step in the right direction) setting out to close ident questions because they don't meet a metric that 99% of question askers will have never seen is utterly counter-productive to the site's overall aims.


Might I suggest that if you don't like the quality of the questions we get, your best option is to place them on your ignore-tags list, rather than trying to deal with the problem at source.

  • 1
    "This question does not meet our minimum standard for identification-based questions. Please see our guidelines for acceptable identification requests to see what questions and details are appropriate." this is the message on anime.se when a question is put on hold because of lacking quality. and adding the tag to the ignored list, prevents me from seeing the good questions... – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 20:35
  • 2
    @Armin - So your solution is to close all the questions you don't like, based on a metric that the overwhelming majority of askers will have never seen? Perhaps you should head over to Movies:SE and ask them how well that works. – Valorum Apr 15 '16 at 20:36
  • like I said, I'm somewhat active on Anime:SE and while there are still a lot of low quality posts, people who are interested in getting answers try to improve their questions, which leads to reopening them. – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 20:39
  • 2
    @Armin - My experience on Movies:SE is that by closing questions based on quality standards, the majority of askers (of those questions closed) don't bother coming back. They periodically make snarky comments about unfriendliness but for the most part, they just leave and never return. Now there's a certain argument that can be made for "and good riddance" but I'd rather invite them in and then leave their question unanswered (while attempting to improve it through persuasion and questioning) then force-close it and lose a potentially valuable user. – Valorum Apr 15 '16 at 20:43
  • 1
    ok, I mixed it up, they aren't closed, they are put on hold. And in my experience, they either don't react at all or ask what they could improve (very seldom). But I haven't seen one that complained about the community being unfriendly. – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 20:48
  • @Armin Different SE sites have different standards. As Richard said, SFF is unusually tolerant of story-ID on the whole, because (for some reason) the quality of our story-ID questions tends to be much higher than on other sites. Compare with the M&TV site, for instance, which has a big problem with terrible story-ID questions. Most of ours are high-quality with good descriptions, and a good proportion of them are successfully solved. We do get some bad ones, but we're not afraid to close them if necessary (e.g. see this recent example). – Rand al'Thor Apr 15 '16 at 21:32
  • I wholly agree with your answer, however I disagree that the best option is to ignore that tag; I believe the best course of action is to edit and improve the post. – Möoz Apr 17 '16 at 22:45
  • @Mooz - True, but OP seems to be being made angry by more than just the occasional dodgy post. – Valorum Apr 17 '16 at 22:55
-5

Here is an adaption of the lists for SciFi in general:

List from the first thread:

  • Any description of the leading/recurring character(s) (i.e. physical description, behavior, etc.)
  • Any description of any distinctive features, including the plot and related elements (e.g. girls who are soda cans that do battle, or i.e., the setting, the plot)
  • What the genre or cinematic style was (e.g. mecha, sci-fi, fantasy, cyberpunk, action, noir, etc.)
  • What were characteristic effects, e.g. lots of lens flares, lots of unfinished sentences, no color except certain elements, etc
  • When and where you saw it (if you saw it when you were a kid, don't give your age, give the approximate year, and month if possible)
  • Who the publisher, licensor, and/or distributor was
  • Type of media: TV show, movie, book, fanfiction, etc.
  • Any image(s), audio, or video(s) related to the series (an exception may be made for questions with one or more of these items)

List from the second thread:

Primary

  • A complete description of one significant character: Hair color, eye color, skin tone, clothes, etc.
  • A complete description of one significant location: Type of location (farm, house, etc.), style of location (colors, notable characteristics), etc.
  • A complete description of a plot point: Detailed information about a story arc, central theme of an episode, or concept focused on

Secondary

  • Character's name (approximations are fine)
  • Incomplete character descriptions: Gender, approximate hair style, etc.
  • Type of media: TV show, one-shot, book, audiobook, fanfiction etc.
  • Publisher, licensor, distributor, etc.

Tertiary

  • Year you saw it (and month, if possible)
  • Publication you read it in, or TV channel/network you saw it on
  • What language your read/saw it in
  • What kind of art style it has
  • Genre
  • I don't think we're going to get new users to read a long checklist before they post their question. Granted, some story-identification questions are far too vague, but the worst of them simply receive downvotes and no answers, and the roomba will clean them up later. And I have seen some accepted answers based on surprisingly little information. For questions that really are bad/vague enough to warrant closing, they could be closed as "unclear what you're asking," rather than "closed for not following this huge checklist." – Molag Bal Apr 15 '16 at 20:53
  • 1
    @amarillo - Yup. No matter how blatant you make the "read me", 98.9% of users will utterly ignore it. Clubbing them over the head with it doesn't help matters, it just p*sses them off :-) The correct thing to do is to downvote anything that you feel lacks sufficient quality or research. – Valorum Apr 15 '16 at 21:02
  • @Richard might be... My first question on Anime:SE was also flagged as low quality, but maybe I'm different and when I ask something, I want to know it... – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 21:07
  • @Armin - I find it interesting how tolerant we are on SFF:SE and how intolerant they are on Movies:SE. To give one example, I've been actively berated for answering low quality ident questions over there. If you did that over here, you'd get applause. – Valorum Apr 15 '16 at 21:09
  • @amarillo but misusing the "unclear what you're asking" is wrong as well. In my question, I put an example, that could also be asked on scifi. It is clear that the asker wants to know the name of the manga, but given the information, you need to "spam" answers. – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 21:11
  • 1
    @Richard well, it is understandable. They said that they don't want low quality questions and answering such questions is rewarding the asker. Others read those questions and think that it is ok to ask the questions with the same quality. – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 21:12
  • @Armin OK, if there are no close reasons appropriate for the worst story identification questions, then maybe we need a new custom off-topic reason. Movies.SE has an off-topic reason for story identification questions (seen here), but I'm not a fan of its wording. But I think that this checklist is overdoing it. And that specific movies.SE question received an answer, but at least it shows their custom close reason. – Molag Bal Apr 15 '16 at 21:16
  • @amarillo Anime.SE has a very similar message (here). Also it seems that Movies.SE closes them and Anime.SE puts them on hold. – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 21:19
  • @Armin The question I linked to is old enough that it's no longer on hold. It probably wasn't closed immediately. I might support a close reason that says something "more details are needed to answer this question," without requiring users to follow a specific checklist. – Molag Bal Apr 15 '16 at 21:22
  • 1
    @amarillo ok, my wording was bad. These two lists list information that can help identifying a story. If you have a second-by-second description of the events, that would be enough information as well. This isn't meant as a strict rule but as an orientation... – Armin Apr 15 '16 at 21:24

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .