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Considering the last time this was asked, we decided that these questions were iffy at best.

Do we need the tag though? To paraphrase dlanod's answer, it's not clear how the tag should be used. It can :

Either ask a question that can be answered yes/no with reasoning like Is the movie rendition of the Golden Compass significantly different from the book? or ask about a given character, plot point, device, etc. How True to Canon Was Denethor's Movie Characterization? is a great example of the latter.

Or ask a question like What plot points are missing in the Harry Potter movies that are in the novels? which is far too broad despite the fact that it elicited a long answer.

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    The last question being "far too broad" is the opinion expressed by dlanod in the post you link to, but it doesn't seem to be shared by the community at large, since the question has never been closed! – Rand al'Thor Feb 14 '16 at 13:17
5

Yes.

Questions about the differences between a book and its film adaptation are usually quite distinctive and not like any other type of question on this site, needing a special approach in order to find answers to them. So from the beginning I'm tending towards thinking they should have their own tag.

Disclaimer: I also have a personal liking for this kind of question, although it's not one of my "favourited" tags, and I believe I have more posts in this tag than anyone else.

Going through the criteria in AncientSwordRage's answer, I found a few which I disagree with, and thought the differences were enough to be worth making a new answer.

(Tag scoring criteria, as ever, are copied from this post.)

  1. Does it make sense to be an "expert" in ?
    No; score -1.
  2. Does it make sense for a question to be tagged only with ?
    No (there should also be a tag for the film or franchise in question); score -1.
  3. Does have a single, universally-unambiguous meaning?
    Yes (the tag wiki description is clear enough); score 2.
  4. Is likely to be used correctly just based on its name?
    Yes ; score 2.
  5. Are there "enough" (> 15) but not "too many" (> 10% site-wide) questions that qualify for ?
    Yes (there are 79 questions with this tag, and certainly not thousands that need it); score 2.
  6. Are people likely to use to find questions to answer?
    Maybe (this is one of my favourite tags, and I just went browsing through it to find a question to answer, so others might be doing the same); score 1.
  7. Are there likely some users (be objective!) who will favorite or ignore ?
    Yes (the tag already has 6 "followers"); score 2.
  8. Could be reasonably used to feed questions to a specialized chat room?
    No; score -1.
  9. Can be used to search for questions (for any reason) in a way that keyword searching cannot accomplish?
    Yes; score 2.

Total is 8, which should be enough for the tag to be not worth destroying. From the linked question:

tags that score > 12 are "good" tags, tags that score < 8 are "terrible" tags, others are likely good but may need some clarification/renaming/etc.

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    This wouldn't convince me to create one but it certainly shows there's no reason to remove it. – Mazura Feb 14 '16 at 14:23
  • Question 1 could be maybe since many fan bases have the types of people who look into these things and that these people will probably do it for any franchise they like, not limiting the tag to be franchise specific. Question 8 could be yes as, again, the people who analyze this like to have lengthy conversations on it. This would further reinforce that this a good tag... which I feel it is! – Skooba Feb 15 '16 at 21:20
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No.

This post has a tag scoring sheet, copied over from another site, to determine what makes a good tag. Let's see how scores:

  1. Does it make sense to be an "expert in "?*
    No; score -1.
  2. Does it make sense for a question to be tagged only with "?
    No (there should also be a tag for the film or franchise in question); score -1.
  3. Does have a single, universally-unambiguous meaning?
    Maybe (as you present good and bad questions); score 1.
  4. Is likely to be used correctly just based on its name?
    Yes ; score 2.
  5. Are there "enough" (> 15) but not "too many" (> 10% site-wide) questions that qualify for ?
    Maybe? Someone would have to count them to check, but it'd be too difficult to check because of how common the words book and movie are 1.
  6. Are people likely to use to find questions to answer?
    No? Not without other tags -1.
  7. Are there likely some users (be objective!) who will favorite or ignore ?
    Yes? The fact that someone has asked if they are OK, indicates someone might ignore them at least! Score 2.
  8. Could be reasonably used to feed questions to a specialized chat room?
    No; score -1.
  9. Can be used to search for questions (for any reason) in a way that keyword searching cannot accomplish?
    Yes because book and movie probably appear too often to narrow it down without the tag; score 2.

Total is 4, which is apparently not enough for the tag to be worth creating. From the linked question:

tags that score > 12 are "good" tags, tags that score < 8 are "terrible" tags, others are likely good but may need some clarification/renaming/etc

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    The fact that your scoring and rand's scoring are "objective" but actually different, and are getting voted differently, show me that this rating system is currently ineffectual. FWIW, I don't think "book-vs-movie" is universally unambiguous because it could mean "What's different in these?" or "Should I watch or read first?", further changing the score. – user31178 Feb 14 '16 at 17:57

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