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This question already has an answer here:

I am new to this discussion and trying to wrap my head around the terms I see on this site. Certainly, "In-universe" comes up all the time.

Does it mean in a certain version of a story. For example, the difference between the story in Star Trek 2009 and Star Trek?

marked as duplicate by Wad Cheber, Jason Baker, Rand al'Thor, user1027 Dec 3 '15 at 1:49

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"In-universe" means that it is something valid or correct from the point of view of fictional story (or a universe of stories, e.g. Harry Potter)

This is opposite of "out of universe", aka "outside the 4th wall" - things which are true in our real world.

A good example of in-universe vs. out-of-universe information is:

Q: Why did this character on fiction TV show die?

A: (in-universe): Because this other character was a son of a person the first character killed, and they wanted revenge.

A: (out-of-universe): Because the character was played by an actor who was demanding a salary too high for the budget.

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