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Many large franchises have multiple tags and hyphenated tags. If I want to define the scope of my topic as one subset of the franchise, do I use tags or another method?

Example: Assume my question is limited to everything Star Wars except the Star Wars Anthology films. I am required to include the star-wars tag, then I must include many other tags, however I only have four I can choose. These are the on-topic films for my problem: the-phantom-menace, attack-of-the-clones, revenge-of-the-sith, a-new-hope, the-empire-strikes-back, return-of-the-jedi, the-force-awakens, the-last-jedi, star-wars-9

Now my topic excludes the Anthology, for whatever reason. An answer that comes from the Anthology is off-topic, is this correct? However, I was forced to include the generic star-wars tag so it is forced to be on-topic.

What am I missing please?

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The typical way to narrow scope is by adding that into the body of the question. You're always welcome to define the subset of information that your question is asking about and to invite users to upvote and downvote accordingly, depending on how well they feel that other users have answered the question that you're asking.


That being said, if you narrow it for no good reason (and with no explanation) you're likely to incur downvotes and votes for closure as 'unclear'.

Also, be aware that others may still chime in with useful information from elsewhere in the same franchise (especially if you exclude large, information rich sources of canon) if they feel that it's relevant/useful to the question that you're asking. Again, the community may vote with their feet and give the answer upvotes even if you feel it's not met your own personal criteria. That is, unfortunately, one of the breaks when you decide that a certain title/property/whatever isn't something you're interested in hearing about. Just because you aren't interested, doesn't mean that the rest of the community will agree with you.

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