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Are all, if any, of Dr. Seuss's many books on topic?

I'm aware that anthropomorphic animals are not on-topic, but the vast majority of his works include far more elements as well:

  • Many of his books include imaginary animals
  • Many of his books include fantastical places and scenery.
  • Most importantly, and the books I would like to ask about, his Barthomolow and the King series are very much classical fantasy-like in nature, particularly "The 500 hats" and "Oobleck".

So, is Dr Seuss on topic?

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See our general policy on what makes a work on-topic or not:

  1. If it's marketed as SF, it's on-topic.
  2. If magic, futuristic science or technology, alternate history, or other sf-nal concept is an important part of the overall plot, it's on-topic. (Alice in Wonderland, Clockwork Orange, etc.)
  3. If the question is specifically about an sf-nal element, even if it's only a minor part of the work, it's on-topic.
  4. If it's set in an on-topic universe, it's on-topic.
  5. If you're not sure it's SF but you think a good case can be made for it, it's on-topic.
  6. If there is a minor supernatural element (e.g. a fortune teller's prediction comes true, or someone sees a ghost, or a story for children involving anthropomorphic animals) but it's just a throwaway plot element that's not particularly relevant to the question, it's off-topic.

I can't say for sure whether all of Dr Seuss's works are on-topic, but it's easy to see that some of them are, just by reading brief descriptions/summaries of them.

  • Many of his books include imaginary animals

    Books about imaginary animals, such as the Grinch in *How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, are on-topic.

  • Many of his books include fantastical places and scenery.

    Books set in fantasy worlds, such as Whoville in various Seuss stories, are on-topic.

  • Most importantly, and the books I would like to ask about, his Barthomolow and the King series are very much classical fantasy-like in nature, particularly "The 500 hats" and "Oobleck".

    I hadn't heard of this story before, but a quick glance at its Wikipedia page was enough:

    "The king gets the idea that ruling the sky is the task of his Royal Magicians so he orders Bartholomew to summon them. When he expresses his wish to the magicians, they announce they can make something called Oobleck which won't look like the regular weather. Next morning Bartholomew sees the first sign that the Oobleck (a sticky green slime) is falling."

    An imaginary kingdom, magicians, supernatural weather ... how could this NOT be on-topic?

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